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From the Archives: An Essay by Dan Beachy-Quick

Dan Beachy-Quick’s essay, “Of Verdant Themes: Toward one sentence in Proust,” was originally published in our Summer 2009 issue. The essay is a strong consideration of memory, beauty, and reality as read through Proust’s In Search of Lost Time.  He is a poet, essayist, and the author of four poetry collections, and excerpts from his most recent essay collection, A Quiet Book, are forthcoming in Puerto del Sol‘s Spring 2016 issue. His work has appeared widely in, among others, The Chicago Review, FENCE, Paris Review, and The New York Times, in addition his poetry appearing in Best American Poetry 2008. He currently serves as Poetry Advisor for A…

Weekend Reading: Lit Links

Another fine New Mexican Friday is upon us. Let’s get your weekend started right. First up, are you familiar with book trailers? If so, have you see the latest goofy, self-deprecating ones? Then you’re in for an ironic treat. Disturbing, all this talk of banned books lately. Read about a bookseller in Hong Kong that is determined to keep “banned” books on the shelves. If you have children, and those children ask for—nay, demand—McDonald’s, you can feel better about it for the next ten days, because until February 15, all Happy Meals will contain a children’s book instead of the…

From the Archives: Matt Bell on the Original Star Wars

Matt Bell is the author of three novels and one collection of short fiction, and his most recent novel, Scrapper (Soho Press, 2015), will be reviewed in Puerto del Sol‘s forthcoming print issue. Before all that, Bell participated in a “Pop Culture Q&A” in our Winter 2010 issue, 45.2. With the popularity of Star Wars: The Force Awakens, we thought it only appropriate to highlight Bell’s contribution to the decades-long conversation about Star Wars and American popular culture.   Matt Bell and the Original Star Wars Q: We want to create a reading of the seminal 1977 film Star Wars. Will you provide us with a paragraph or…

The PdS Black Voices Series Presents: JENNIFER MCCAULEY

      Loriella is Dead     Yesterday Loriella choke-cried into my phone, saying we black gals got to stick together, hip to hip since the world is a leech sucking at our night necks, and I said girlIhearyou and I could hear her voice cleaving clean down the center and I remembered this was the girl who kicked a blackboy down the stairs of Litchfield Towers, and burned my books in the dorm yard when I told her I couldn’t love her like that– With all-the-time love, with only-her love   and she said give me sweet words…

Weekend Reading: Lit Links

Political poetics. The creative class(ism). Young black heroines. Fractal literature. Haikus? This Weekend Reading will keep you moving and shaking. It’s the end of January, your New Year’s resolutions have lost their shine, but you want a project for February. Why not go small and take a stab at National Haiku Writing Month? If that’s still too much of a commitment, let the US Political Poetry Generator do all the work. But don’t be surprised if you don’t like everything you hear. 11-year-old Marley Dias was tired of reading stories about white male protagonists, so she created #1000BlackGirlBooks to collect…

Weekend Reading: Lit Links

We’ve heard that there is an epic blizzard hitting the East Coast right now. Shhh. Can you hear it? Neither can we here in New Mexico. First up, are you a poet in the Seattle area that needs a job and studio space and  happens to love bridges? You’re in luck. The city of Seattle is offering up the northwest tower of the Fremont Bridge to a poet for one year plus a $10,000 stipend. Wait, another link worth a potential ten grand? Don’t ever say that Puerto del Sol doesn’t love you. The National Book Foundation’s 2016 Innovations in…

From the Archives: “How We Stand” by Gary Soto

Gary Soto’s essay “How We Stand” appeared in Puerto del Sol in the fall of 1987. With the frankness and poignancy that is so characteristic of his work, Soto reflects on the instability of social constructs such as masculinity, accomplishment and self-worth. Born in Fresno and raised in a working-class family, Soto has been publishing poetry since the late 70’s. His early work met with considerable success, with his second collection of poems, The Tale of Sunlight, being nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in 1978. Soto is also renowned for his young adult and children’s literature, which also draws from everyday…

Weekend Reading: Lit Links

The holidays are over. New Year’s is done. It’s time to get started making this year sing. Need some inspiration? Then read on, friends. First off, some sad news: icon David Bowie died last Sunday at the age of 69. Select one of Bowie’s 100 favorite books and listen to The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars to honor his artistic legacy. And speaking of iconic musicians, read how a love letter between Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo inspired Patti Smith’s music and writing and set the tone for her future relationships. What is the…

The PdS Black Voices Series Presents: RACQUEL GOODISON

      They Came A Triptych of Sorts       They came in a book, in a call, in a song, in every classroom lesson. They come until you come, if you can get there. If you can prove you have what it takes to belong, so they should let you stay. Or that you are so bound to home, you are destined to be a visitor, a tourist of sorts.     A. England came for Avril by way of the printed word. She had passed all nine of her A’Levels. Reached 18. Survived 7 years under…

Weekend Reading: Lit Links

Happy 2016! Let’s kick off the New Year right with some great links: If you’re like us, you might be in the market for belated holiday gifts (sorry, Mom!). How about a poem? Poet Vanessa Kisuule is selling personalized poems and anyone can request one, for themselves or someone else. To get the poem, you are asked to donate to a Syrian refugee fund. You’ve thought it. We’ve all thought it. But now it’s proven: books really are better than their movie adaptations. What is it about fairy tales that so enchants us? Find out how deep psychology makes them…

From the Archives: David Foster Wallace’s “Everything is Green”

“Everything is Green” is one of ten stories featured in Wallace’s first story collection, Girl With Curious Hair, published by W. W. Norton in August of 1989; however, this (uncharacteristically) brief piece was first seen in the pages of Puerto del Sol’s Fall 1988 issue. While slight—totaling a mere 688 words—this single-scene, dialogue-centric sketch is surprisingly broad in the sense that it permits any number of interpretations—even those as diametrically opposed as the dueling perspectives of the fictional characters Mayfly and Mitch. Considering this early version alongside the one that appeared in Wallace’s collection (as excerpted in Harper’s Magazine one…